Is hiring and retaining the right employees an ongoing challenge for your organization? You’re in good company. Many organizations struggle to find employees who are a great match in terms of desired skills, experience, personality, and cultural fit. But there are some common misconceptions that persist in the hiring process – and they may be holding you back from attracting and keeping top talent. Let’s look at strategies for avoiding these mistakes the next time you add to your team.

Misconception #1: You know what your company culture is.

Culture is the most important characteristic of a company, but it’s also the most difficult to define. Your website may feature a persuasive mission statement, but that doesn’t mean you have a clear understanding of what your company’s day-to-day culture is like.

How to fix it: Culture is about the people in your company, so gather honest employee input. If it’s challenging to get people to speak freely, work with an external partner on this step. Ask employees, from entry-level staff to team leaders, about your organization’s culture. What is it like to work there? What are the pros and cons? Are there fatal flaws that need to be addressed? Look for through lines in employee responses.

Misconception #2: You know what role you need to fill.

When you have an important position to fill, the default is often to jump straight into writing the job description, without first taking time for reflection.

How to fix it: Look at the whole picture when you picture your ideal hire. If Joanna just vacated a crucial IT leadership position, what gaps is she leaving behind? Note essential skills and experience, of course, but don’t forget to overlook other important qualities. How did she contribute to company culture in a positive way? Was she a mentor to younger employees? How did she help with problem solving and long-term planning? What characteristics did she lack that you would like to see in her replacement?

Misconception #3: You know what candidates want.

Not all people are the same, and not all candidates value the same attributes in a job. If you assume you know what selling points will speak to applicants, you may be off base.

How to fix it: Do your due diligence to see what current industry standards are for salary and benefits. But also focus on what you can offer potential employees beyond money, especially if you are on a strict budget. What would an early career developer prioritize? Flexible schedule, remote work options, one free day a week to work on new projects? How does this list change for a developer who has been in the field for 10 years? Do they put emphasis on having a great team, a leadership role, an easy commute?

Pay attention to these misconceptions and others that can stand in the way of a great hire.

Learn more about Managed Service Solutions, or MS3, York Solutions’ customized workforce development solution.